For many new mothers, parenting can usher in a variety of challenges that can feel insurmountable. The long nights, the social isolation, and the guilt of not measuring up that seems to permeate motherhood can all take a toll on any mother’s mental health. Not being able to leave a child at home in order to get to a therapist appointment shouldn’t be the deciding factor in whether or not a mom has access to treatment. And that’s why we love the option of online therapy. For surprisingly low costs, anyone can access high quality, licensed therapists who specialize in specific issues. What does that mean for a new mom? It means access to help without having to move mountains.   

Talk Space

Talk Space gives clients the flexibility and privacy they need by conducting therapy online. The first step is to fill out an online assessment in order to get matched with a therapist. From there, you can choose from a variety of plans that start at $65 a week (and many insurance companies will cover). And then, using text and video, you can begin your therapy sessions. 

Open Path

For those who are underinsured or lack health insurance, Open Path is an affordable option. Starting as low as $30 per session (typical therapy sessions average $150 in private practices) this can be a great option. The intention is to provide quality mental health services for those without insurance so if you have insurance you might not be able to sign up. That said, if you have Medicaid you may qualify if there are no therapy options in your area. 

Better Help

Better Help is a great option for those who want to use text or email, video or voice to conduct their therapy sessions. Their huge pool of licensed therapist’s offer opportunities to work with one who specializes in specific issues such as parenting, family conflicts, trauma, LGBTQ+ matters, addictions, and many more. 

Amwell’s Postpartum Depression Treatment Online

Mothers who experience postpartum depression suffer through an array of symptoms that can include overwhelming feelings of anxiety or sadness that can interfere with their ability to connect with and care for their baby. This is why online therapy to treat PPD is so important because a therapist can meet a mother exactly where she is via the internet, from the comfort of her own home.  

Centre for Interactive Mental Health Services (CIMHS)

This free service doesn’t include talk therapy. Instead, this is an eight-week course to help anyone who wants to manage their depression. These self-guided courses are based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which has been long-known to be an effective treatment for depression. Each session begins with a tool that helps you measure your mood, gives you educational lessons on how to manage emotions and moods, and gives you the chance to practice cognitive behavioral techniques to reinforce the lessons. 

7 Cups

7 Cups is perfect for those who maybe don’t need mental health services but do need to feel heard and seen. This organization uses a huge network of volunteer “listeners” who will listen to anyone who needs to unload. They have volunteers geared toward teens, adults, and for specific issues such as depression, anxiety, relationships, LGBTQ+ and more. This is not therapy but rather, an opportunity to connect with other people through texting or phone calls.

Health Sapiens

Health Sapiens is an affordable online therapy option for those looking for a subscription-based model. Meaning, you pay a monthly fee for services that you expect to continue over the course of a longer period of time. Depending on how many sessions you need a month, the fee of $150 a month works out to be one of the most affordable options out there and includes access to board-certified licensed therapists.

boober

Boober is a doula-founded pregnancy and postpartum resource destination where parents can find virtual and in-person doulas, lactation support, therapists, and more. For mamas seeking mental health support, they offer access to experienced, licensed, and vetted professionals who specialize in a variety of postpartum issues, ranging from PPD and PPA to birth trauma, to transitioning back to work. 

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